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FAQ’s

  1. Who was Maria Montessori?
  2. What is the Montessori method?
  3. What is meant by “The Absorbent Mind”?
  4. What are the “sensitive periods”?
  5. What is the Montessori concept of discipline?
  6. What happens to children who transfer from a Montessori school to a public school?
Who was Maria Montessori?

She was an Italian physician and educator — the first woman to receive a medical degree in Italy. Born in 1870, she developed her method of education early in this century, for children from 2 years of age through high school. At the time of her death in 1952, she was working on the college curriculum.

What is the Montessori method?

It is an approach to education that takes into consideration the entire potential of a child socially, mentally, physically and emotionally — utilizing unique didactic teaching tools under the guidance of highly trained Montessori teachers. It is a highly individualized system of education that utilizes sensory training.

What is meant by “The Absorbent Mind”?

“The Absorbent Mind” refers to the child’s tremendous, innate ability to absorb ideas, concepts and knowledge from the environment. She entitled her major textbook, “The Absorbent Mind.”

What are the “sensitive periods”?

These are periods of unusual sensitivity to learning — which every child passes through on his way to adulthood. Dr. Montessori noted these periods of intense interest in learning specific skills and referred to them as periods of specific maturational aptness. She observed that the sensitive period from reading and writing occurs between three and five years of age.

What is the Montessori concept of discipline?

The Montessori discipline is an “inner discipline.” The child develops control over his own behavior through his work with the Montessori materials. Dr. Montessori noted that many so-called discipline problems occur when children were really frustrated by lack of proper, constructive, intellectual stimulation. When a child’s intellectual and creative energies are utilized in a constructive manner, there is no energy left over for deviate behavior.


What happens to children who transfer from a Montessori school to a public school? 

For over half a century, we have observed the achievement of Montessori children in the public school system and have found them to be highly adaptable, enthusiastic about school, and independent in their study habits. They are often accelerated.